Volume 10 Week 10

Friday, Oct. 20


 

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Orléans Ward
Bob Monette

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Tim Tierney

 

 

 

   

 

(Posted 7:30 a.m., Sept. 28)
Fraudulent electrical contractor handed $10K in fines
By Mike Beasley
Orléans Online

Apparently not every consumer has heard of the term “Caveat Emptor” or the contract law principle of “Buyer Beware”. Potential shoppers need to be more aware and execute due diligence when purchasing goods and services through private sales, referrals or online sites.

A prime example of doing the required homework was illustrated on Aug. 29 when Yvon Richer of Orleans, Ontario, was con-victed in an Ottawa court and ordered to pay a $10,000 fine plus a 25% ($2,500) victim surcharge for advertising electrical work without a licence on Kijiji.

Unfortunately for Richer, he has a prior history of misbehaviour when it comes to his fraudulent services. Fortunately for consumers, his illegal activity was identified and dealt with by the law.

In 2014, Richer was convicted by the Provincial Offences Court in Ottawa on two counts of working without an electrical contractor’s licence and failing to take out a permit for electrical work.

He didn’t learn his lesson the first time after being issued a fine of $1,000 plus a victim surcharge on each count.

“Electrical safety is a partnership and we all have a role to play,” says Scott Saint, Chief Public Safety Officer with the Electrical Safety Authority.

“ESA has dedicated resources to help combat contractors from doing electrical work without a licence which is what helped secure this conviction. It is also the responsibility of home-owners to do their homework and make sure the contractors they hire are properly licensed. Your family’s safety is at stake when you take shortcuts with electrical work.”

Kijiji promotes itself as an online classified advertising service that operates as a centralized network of online communities for posting local ads but it cannot check the certificates and qualifications of each vendor.

Many Ontarians turn to online ads to source services for their home but when it comes to your home, you should always do your homework.

Your family’s safety is at stake when you take shortcuts with electrical upgrades in your home. On the ESA website www.esasafe.com the message is clear – always hire a Licensed Electrical Contractor. It’s the law.

Licensed Electrical Contractors are the ONLY business in Ontario legally allowed to do electrical work in your home. Failing to hire one could result in injury, death, loss of property, or denied insurance claims.

If anyone believes Richer conducted work on their property, contact ESA’s Customer Service Centre at 1-877-372-7233. They can provide assistance to help ensure the electrical work that has been done is safe and to code.

When searching for licensed electrical contractor ESA suggests following these guidelines.

Always ask for their electrical contrac-tor’s licence number from ECRA/ESA. It should be on their business card, estimate and their vehicle.

Also, make sure to get an ESA Certificate of Inspection for your records, when the electrical work is complete. You can verify and/or find a Licensed Electrical Contractor in Ontario using ESA’s using the ‘search by contractor’ function on their website.

All Licensed Electrical Contractors are fully insured, will arrange permits, can offer a Certificate of Inspection and will willingly provide references. .

(This story was made possible thanks to the generous support of our local business partners.)

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