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ORLEANS FARMERS MARKET from 11 am to 4 pm in the parking lot at the Ray Friel Recreation Centre on Tenth Line Road. Shop the freshest seasonal produce, meat and dairy, baked goods, prepared foods, crafts and more while getting to know the folks who grew and made it.

BLACKBURN FUN FAIR OPENING DAY 4-10 PM – Mojo Magic Show 5:30 pm; Craft Beer Night 5-10 pm; Soul Motion on stage 7-10 pm. Visit blackburnfunfair.ca for a complete schedule of all the activities and events.

BLACKBURN FUN FAIR – Pancake breakfast from 8 a.m. to 10 p.m. Fun Fair parade 10 am to 10:30 am. Inflatable rides 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Fun Fair games outside the arena from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. BBQ 11 am to 3 pm. Ray's Reptiles, 11 am to 12 pm and 1-2 pm. Bouncy Castle inside the arena 11 am to 4 pm. Main stage entertainment 11 am to 5 pm. Beer Garden 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. and from 7 p.m. to 11:45 p.m. Cake cutting at 1 p.m. 7:00 pm – 11:45 pm: Musical act Fake McCoys followed by Mothership 7-11:45 pm. Fireworks show at 10 p.m. Visit blackburnfunfair.ca for a complete schedule of all the activities and events.

ST. HELEN’S FINE ART FAIR from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at St. Helen’s Anglican Church, 1234 Prestone Dr., Orléans. This year’s art fair is supporting the Young Artists Initiative. You can view the artists’ galleries at sthelensartfair.ca and follow on Facebook at facebook.com/sthelensartfair.

CUMBERLAND FARMERS MARKET from 9 am to 1 pm at the Cumberland Arena, 1115 Dunning Rd. in Cumberland Village. Farmers, bakers, artists, crafters, gardeners, chefs and friends. For more information facebook.com/cumberland.f.market.

GARAGE SALE – 1062 and 1049 Deauville Cres and others 8 am to 4 pm. Rain date Sun. June 2, same hours.. 100s of artist’s tools, canvases, easels, brushes, portfolios etc Household items, children’s books, puzzles, toys and treasures!

 

 

OST production presents the best of Winnie-the-Pooh
Fred Sherwin
April 27, 2023

I have to admit that growing up in the 1970s, I was a huge fan of Winnie-the-Pooh. Which is why it warmed my heart when I heard that Ottawa School of Theatre’s all ages class would be presenting a series of Winnie-the-Pooh stories at the Shenkman Arts Centre on April 14, 15 and 16.

The all ages class at the Ottawa School of Theatre perform Winnie the Pooh at the Shenkman Arts Centre. FRED SHERWIN PHOTO

When it comes to children’s classics from the 1960s and 1970s – I’m talking about the animated versions – Winnie-the-Pooh stands right up there with the Charlie Brown and the Peanuts. And like the Peanuts, Winnie-the-Pooh still stands the test of time.

The OST production included six of the most well-known and much-loved stories about Pooh and his friends Rabbit, Eeyore, Owl, Kanga, Roo and Piglet. (For some strange reason, Tigger was not included.)

In the opening story, a hungry Winnie-the-Pooh decides to try and climb a tree to get some honey. When that doesn’t work, he comes up with an idea to attach himself to a helium balloon and float up to the honey. When that doesn’t work, Christopher Robin has to use a slingshot to burst the balloon so that Pooh can get back to earth.

The second story was about the time when Winnie-the-Pooh got stuck in the door leaving Rabbit’s house after he ate all of Rabbit’s honey and had to be extricated by Christopher Robin. In the OST production, the cast elicited the help of the younger members of the audience who all pulled together to free Pooh from the door.

The third story was about when Winnie-the-Pooh and Piglet came up with a plan to catch a Heffalump only to have Pooh get his head stuck in a honey pot which Piglet
mistakes as one of the mysterious elephant-like creatures and runs away frightened.

The fourth story is about the time when Eeyore’s misplaced tail ends up being used as a bell ringer at Owl’s house.

The fifth story, which was entitled “A Very Strange Creature”, was about when Winnie-the-Pooh and the gang first meet Kanga and Roo in the Hundred Acre Wood.

The sixth and finally story is about when Christopher Robin and Winnie-the-Pooh throw a birthday party for Eeyore to try and cheer him up.

As all ages productions go, you can’t go wrong with Winnie-the-Pooh. The A.A. Milne children’s classic was first published in 1926, but the stories and the main character didn’t become broadly popular until Walt Disney turned them into an animated series in 1961. All of which to say, it has been enjoyed by several generations over the years, which is why it is such an all ages classic.

One of the things I liked most about the OST production was the use of the large cast to enable a different cast member to play both Winnie-the-Pooh and Christopher Robin in each scene or story.

To learn more about the Ottawa School of Theatre and the various classes they provide for aspiring actors of all ages visit ost-eto.ca.

 
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