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e-Edition
Dec. 19, 2019

e-Edition
12 déc 2019






REAL ESTATE LISTINGS




Events


BREAKFAST AT THE LEGION – Enjoy breakfast at the Orléans Legion from 8 a.m to 11 a.m. with table service provide by local Cadets. $2 from the sale of every breakfast will go toward the Legion.


NAVAN WINTERFEST from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Navan Fairgrounds. Plenty of winter activities for young and old alike. Chili lunch.


FAMILY FUN NIGHT at Aquaview Park (318 Aquaview Drive), Skating under glow lights, free wagon rides, hot chocolate taffy on snow and much more.


THE GLOUCESTER HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY PRESENTS “Culinary delights with herbs and edible flowers” – at 7 p.m. at the Queenswood Heights Community Centre, 1485 Duford Dr. Guest speaker and Nancy McDonald, Master Gardener. Public is welcome free of charge. Membership is $20 per person per year, $25 for a family and $5 for students.


FAMILY DAY BOWLING – Join Orléans MP Marie-France Lalonde for a morning of free bowling at the Orléans Bowling Centre, 885 Taylor Creek Dr. Everyone welcome. No need to RSVP. Guests are encouraged to bring non-perishable food items for our local food banks.

 

Effort to be environmentally conscious ends longstanding tradition
By Heather Jamieson
Jan. 19, 2018

As I shopped this season, it struck me that technology and modern means of accessing information have actually impacted my “go-to” list of gifts. Gift-giving used to be so simple: all our son wanted was Lego and our daughter the latest Buffy movie. (Oh yes, and about 30 years ago all she wanted – and wanted desperately – was a manicure set.)

Of course, Lego is still on the shopping list, but now, ostensibly, for our son’s nine-year-old daughter. But, kids don’t grow out of Lego and they will build it together.

As our children got older and moved away to school, clothes and kitchen appliances became de rigeur. Eventually, the kids didn’t want me picking out their stuff and gifts evolved into me wrapping a picture (usually disguised in a box!) of winter boots or a guitar with the budgeted amount of cash. But, even then, I could still search for the perfect CD, DVD or cookbook.

Alas, the Internet has made such purchases obsolete. (To say nothing about the VHS and cassette tapes that have accumulated in basement cupboards.) Streaming music and movie channels have been the death knell to gifts of movies or music. While coffee table books and graphic novels remain on “wish lists,” books with facts, recipes and research have been replaced by a quick Google search. Kindles and e-readers are increasingly replacing novels. Maps have been replaced by GPS and wearing perfume (ergo giving perfume) has become socially unacceptable.

I am also learning from our more environmentally-conscious children and grandchild to pay attention to packaging and to avoid non-recyclables. Most days, I now remember my reusable shopping bags and am getting much better at not using the thin plastic bags in the supermarket’s produce department.

I am making real progress in my commitment to reducing my use of single-use plastics. To replace plastic wrap, I first tried beeswax wraps, but because you can’t see through them, it was frustrating not knowing what was in the container. I have since discovered “shower-cap” covers that come in different sizes, are see-through and washable.

However, raising my awareness of the scourge of single-use plastics has come at a cost and is bringing an end to our family tradition of Christmas crackers. We always had them for Christmas dinner when I was growing up in Newfoundland; likely a nod to our British roots.

Christmas crackers were first created in London around 1847 by a confectioner named Tom Smith. He modeled his invention on the French “bonbon” sweets, which were basically almonds wrapped in pretty paper. Smith added a riddle or motto and eventually the “snap” aspect we know so well. After his death, his sons took over the company and added the paper hats and toys or trinkets that continue to this day.

But the shiny paper and cheap plastic toys have led an environmental expert to call for their ban due to the “appalling, unnecessary” waste” they create.

Case in point, my kitchen junk drawer is full of useless plastic thing-a-ma-jigs and other novelties accumulated over many years of pulling Christmas crackers. I can’t justify the amount of garbage that results from the millisecond it takes to pull the crackers apart, especially when the most fun was from everyone reading the jokes or riddles aloud.

So, I am going to retain the fun part and am collecting jokes that we can share at the table. So far, my favourite: “What do you call a snowman who vacations in the tropics? A puddle!”

In less than a week, 2019 will be over. As I contemplate moving into the 2020s, I remember when George Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-Four and 2001: A Space Odyssey were dates of science fiction!

My giving up plastic straws, carrying reusable bags, reducing my use of plastic wrap and ditching Christmas crackers aren’t going to save the planet. But, change always starts with baby steps and every action informs the actions of somebody else.

By next Christmas I hope to have made a few more changes that are better for the planet. Afterall, in 16 months, Swedish teenager Greta Thunberg went from singly skipping school on Fridays to protest lack of action on climate change to becoming a household name and Time magazine’s Person of the Year.

Have a safe and happy Christmas and a healthy, environmentally-conscious 2020.

 

Entertainment

  Sports


Variety is the spice of life at the Shenkman Arts Centre

St. Peter production an ode to 70s era disaster films

Nothing humbug about OST production of 'A Christmas Carol'


Gloucester Rangers go 2-2 in Bell Capital Cup finals

Former Cobra part of Ottawa Gee-Gees World Cup winning team

Local pair capture Fitness America titles

 
Local business

  Opinion

 


CEDAR VALLEY LEBANESE FOOD: Owners celebrate two years in business

 

SANTÉ CHIROPRACTIC & WELLNESS CENTRE: Where healthy people go

 

180-FITNESS CENTRE: Home of the Biggest Loser

 

 

 


VIEWPOINT: Orléans by-election result far from a foregone conclusion

 

WALTER ROBINSON: Ongoing transit problems raise serious questions

 

HEATHER JAMIESON: Effort to be environmentally conscious ends longstanding tradition

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